film and media collection recommended reading bibliography films shown in the news publications photos artifacts 1999-2011 contact logistics schedule participants home

Participants

Erin Alpert
Tony Anemone
Irina Anisimova
Drew Chapman
Nancy Condee
Chip Crane
Maxwell Culbertson
Beach Gray
Randall Halle
Kiun Hwang
Olga Kim
Olga Klimova
John MacKay
Gerald McCausland

Daniel Morgan
Vladimir Padunov
Elena Petrovskaya
Todd Reeser
Natalia Ryabchikova
Dawn Seckler
Igor' Soukmanov
Elise Thorsen
Theodora Kelly Trimble
Vladislav "Slava" Tsukerman
Nina Tsyrkun
Jeremy Woodruff

 

Erin Alpert

Erin Alpert is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. . She received her BA in Russian Studies from the College of William and Mary and MA from the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include documentary cinema, GULAG studies and Holocaust studies and she is currently writing her dissertation on Perestroika and Post-Soviet documentary cinema.

 

Tony Anemone

Tony Anemone is Associate Professor of Russian Language and Literature at The New School. He is the editor of Just Assassins: The Culture of Terrorism in Russia (Northwestern UP, 2010) and author of numerous articles on Russian culture (Peter the Great and the Kunstkamera), literature (Tolstoy, Nabokov, Vaginov, Kharms, Utopia) and cinema (German, Balabanov). He is a member of the editorial boards of Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema and Kinokultura, where he regularly contributes film reviews. With Peter Scotto, he is the translator and editor of "I am a Phenomenon quite out of the ordinary:" The Notebooks, Diaries and Letters of Daniil Kharms (forthcoming by Academic Studies Press).

 

Irina Anisimova

Irina is currently a fourth-year graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. She received her BA Degree in European and American Literature from Saratov State University in 2001 and PhD in Comparative Literature (with the emphasis on African American literature) from the University of South Carolina in 2008. She has published in such journals as The Comparatist, Slavic and East European Journal, and Kinokultura. At the University of Pittsburgh, she has taught courses on Russian literature and culture. She has also taught courses in Women’s Studies and World Literature at the University of South Carolina. Her current research interests include Russian Postmodernism, gothic/fantastic in Russian literature and culture, utopias, Russian empire, postcolonial theory, and African American literature.

 

Drew Chapman

Drew Chapman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. He holds a BA in Russian from the University of Rochester (2004) and MA in Russian Literature from the University of Pittsburgh (2007).


His research interests include contemporary Russian and Soviet film, urban culture and everyday life, and Russian and Soviet satire. He is currently writing his dissertation on narratives of queuing and waiting in Soviet culture.

 

Nancy Condee

Slavic Department; Director of Global Studies (Title VI NRC). Publications include The Imperial Trace: Recent Russian Cinema (Oxford, 2009); Antimonies of Art and Culture: Modernity, Postmodernity, Contemporaneity, co-edited with Terry Smith and Okwui Enwezor (Duke, 2008); Endquote: Sots-Art Literature and Soviet Grand Style, co-edited with Marina Balina and Evgeny Dobrenko (Northwestern UP, 2000); Soviet Hieroglyphics: Visual Culture in Late 20c. Russia, ed. (BFI/Indiana UP, 1995). She is Executive Director of the CD-rom on Thaw cinema, Kino ottepeli (Moscow: Artima Studio, 2002).


Her work, with Vladimir Padunov and separately, has appeared in The Nation, The Washington Post, October, New Left Review, Sight and Sound, and PMLA, as well as major Russian cultural journals (Ab imperio, Znamia, Voprosy literatury, Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, Iskusstvo kino). She has worked as a consultant for the Edinburgh Film Festival, the Library of Congress, and Public Broadcasting for several Frontline documentaries.

 

Chip Crane

Chip Crane is a PhD candidate in the Department of Theatre Arts at the University of Pittsburgh. He holds a B.A. in Theatre Studies from Georgia State University and an M.A. in Theatre and Performance Studies from the University of Pittsburgh. He has published articles and reviews dealing with Soviet, Russian, and Ukrainian theatre and cinema in KinoKultura, Performing Arts Resources, Slavic and East European Journal, Text and Presentation, Theatre Journal and Theatre Survey. He is presently writing his dissertation on the relationship of the Blue Blouse amateur theatre movement to spatial practices in the early Soviet Union.

 

Maxwell Culbertson

Maxwell Culbertson is an undergraduate student in the Russian Major at the University of Pittsburgh. His interests include film, literature, television, and chess.

 

Beach Gray

Beach Gray is a PhD student in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. He holds an MA in Russian Literature from the University of Pittsburgh (2011) and a BA in Russian Studies from Williams College (2007). His research interests include advertising and consumer culture in contemporary Russian visual media, object theory, and documentary cinema.

 

Randall Halle

Randall Halle is the Klaus W. Jonas Professor of German Film and Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests include German visual culture and film theory, critical theory, queer theory, and social philosophy. His essays have appeared in journals such as New German Critique, Screen, German Quarterly, and Film-Philosophy. He is the co-editor of After the Avant-Garde (Camden House, 2008), Light Motives: German Popular Film in Perspective, and the double special issue of Camera Obscura on Marginality and Alterity in Contemporary European Cinema (44 & 46). He is the author of Queer Social Philosophy: Critical Readings from Kant to Adorno (U Illinois, 2004) and German Film after Germany: Toward a Transnational Aesthetic (U Illinois, 2008).

 

Kiun Hwang

Kiun Hwang holids a B.A. in Russian language and literature from Yonsei University in Seoul(2005) and an M.A. in Russian language and literature from Yonsei University in Seoul
(2008). She is currently a first year student at University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her research interests include Russian empire and imperialism in post-soviet culture, contemporary literature, museums and urban construction.

 

Olga Kim

Olga Kim is a first-year graduate student in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. She holds a BA and MA in Russian Language and Literature from the Seoul National University. Her research interests include contemporary Russian literature and film, Central Asian cinema, national identities and nationalism in Soviet and post-Soviet space, visual and network culture.

 

 

Olga Klimova

Olga Klimova is a PhD candidate at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. She also has PhD Certificates in Cultural Studies and Russian and East European Studies, and has completed all the requirements for the PhD Certificate in Film Studies. Olga received her Specialist Degree in Cultural Studies from Belarusian State University in Minsk, Belarus, her MA in Popular Culture from Brock University in Canada, and an MA degree in Russian Literature from the University of Pittsburgh.

Olga has taught a number of film and gender courses at the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film at Brock University, and language, literature, and culture courses at the University of Pittsburgh’s Slavic Department. She is currently writing her PhD dissertation on Aesopian language and Soviet youth films under Brezhnev and doing research on contemporary Polish youth cinema. Her other research interests include Stagnation cinema and literature, Russian youth culture, post-Soviet popular culture and popular cinema, Belarusian cinema, cultural representations of trauma, Chernobyl culture, Uzbek cinema, and theories of spectatorship.

 

John MacKay

John MacKay is Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Film Studies and Chair of the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is the author of Inscription and Modernity: From Wordsworth to Mandelstam (Indiana University Press, 2006), Four Russian Serf Narratives (University of Wisconsin Press, 2009), and articles on Soviet film, film theory, and biography. He is almost finished with Dziga Vertov: Life and Work (Indiana University Press), and just completed True Songs of Freedom: The Russo-Soviet Reception of Uncle Tom's Cabin (University of Wisconsin Press).

 

Gerald McCausland

Lecturer
University of Pittsburgh
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Gerald McCausland teaches at the University of Pittsburgh, where he directs the Russian language program. He holds degrees from the University of Pittsburgh (Ph.D., Russian), Middlebury College (BA, Political Science; MA Russian) and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (MA, German). His publications include articles on Vladimir Sorokin, Viktor Pelevin, and Andrei Platonov as well as translations and film reviews. His current research focuses on post-Soviet Russian identity in contemporary literature and film, particularly on the question of how a psychoanalytically informed study of literature and cinema can illuminate the dynamic relationship between a social collective and its cultural production.

 

Daniel Morgan

Daniel Morgan is an assistant professor of film studies in the Department of English at the University of Pittsburgh. His book, Late Godard and the Possibilities of Cinema, will be published in 2012 by University of California Press, and he has written articles on the history of film theory and other topics.

 

Vladimir Padunov

Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Associate Director, Film Studies Program
Director, Russian Film Symposium
University of Pittsburgh

Padunov received his B.A. from Brooklyn College, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Cornell University. He has taught at the University of Iowa and Hunter College, as well as in Germany and Russia.


Together with Nancy Condee, he directed the Working Group on Contemporary Russian Culture (1990-93), supported by the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council. His work has been published in the US (The Nation, October, WideAngle), the UK (Framework, New Left Review, New Formations), and Russia (Voprosy literatury, Znamia, Iskusstvo kino, Novaia gazeta). His areas of research include Russian visual culture, narrative history and theory, film history.

 

Elena Petrovskaya

Elena Petrovskaya, PhD, is Head of the Department of Aesthetics at the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Her major fields of interest are contemporary philosophy, visual studies, North American literature and culture. Among other books, she is the author of The Unapparent: Essays on the Philosophy of Photography (2002), Anti-photography (2003), and Theory of the Image (2010). She is the compiler, editor, and co-translator of Jean-Luc Nancy’s Corpus (1999) and Gertrude Stein’s selected writings (The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Picasso. Lectures in America. Moscow, 2001). Since 2002 she has been editor-in-chief of the biannual theoretical journal Sinii Divan.

Todd Reeser

Todd Reeser is an Associate Professor in the Department of French and Italian, and the inaugural Associate Director of the Humanities Center, where he is currently serving as Acting Director. He completed his graduate work in French Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1997. Reeser’s research interests lie largely in the areas of gender and sexuality broadly conceived, especially in the early modern period, and he is interested in the various intersections between the ancient world, the Renaissance, and modern theoretical concepts. He is the author of Moderating Masculinity in Early Modern Culture (University of North Carolina Press, 2006) and Masculinities in Theory (Blackwell, 2010).

 

Natalia Ryabchikova

Natalia Ryabchikova is a second-year graduate student in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. She received her BA in Film Studies from the Russian State University of Cinematography (VGIK, Moscow) in 2008. In 2003-2008 she worked as a film critic for the Russian Internet newspaper Utro.ru, and since 2005 she has worked as an interpreter for the Moscow International Film Festival. She has published articles on Soviet film history in Kinovedcheskie zapiski and Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema. Her research interests include Soviet film production in the 1920s, and theory and practice of Sergei Eisenstein.

 

Dawn Seckler

Educated in Russian literature and film studies at the University of Pittsburgh (M.A., PhD.), Dawn Seckler now teaches at Williams College in the Berkshires. Her primary research interests are film genre theory, masculinity studies, and the Russian film industry of the late- and post-Soviet periods. Seckler’s publications include articles on the post-Soviet Russian melodrama, on the problematic status of genre cinema in Russian film history, and the “Hollywoodization” of the Russian cinema industry in the 21st century. She regularly contributes film reviews for Kinokultura. Seckler currently serves as the president of the Working Group on Cinema and Television.

 

Igor' Soukmanov

Igor' Soukmanov graduated from the Belarusian State University in 1992 and completed his graduate studies at the All-Russian State Institute for Filmmaking (VGIK) in 1996 with a degree in film history (Lilia Mamatova’s workshop). Between 1999-2004 he hosted weekly shows on film on several FM radio stations and TV channels in Minsk. Since 2010 he has been the full-time Program Director of the Minsk International Film Festival, curating of special programs, filmmaker retrospectives, and selecting internationally acclaimed feature films for competition. He is currently taking courses on film history and film criticism at the Institute of Journalism of the Belarusian State University. His recent publications include articles and reviews in Iskusstvo kino.

 

Elise Thorsen

Elise Thorsen holds a B.A. in Russian Studies from the College of William & Mary (2006) and an M.A. in Russian Literature from the University of Pittsburgh (2009). This is her fifth year of graduate study at the University of Pittsburgh's Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures. Her dissertation will focus on the evolution of poetic representation of space in the early Soviet Union and its relationship to the Russian experience of empire. Her research interests also include Stalinist cinema and neo-imperial discourses and aesthetics in contemporary Russia

 

Theodora Kelly Trimble

Theodora Kelly Trimble completed a double B.A. in Russian and Slavic & East European Studies from West Virginia University (2009). She received her M.A. in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies from University of Michigan (2011). She is a first year student at University of Pittsburgh in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Her interests include Russian popular culture, film and television, gender studies, sexual culture, and diaspora studies.

 

Vladislav "Slava" Tsukerman

Vladislav "Slava" Tsukerman is a Russian film director. He was born in the Soviet Union and emigrated in 1973 with his wife, Nina Kerova, to Israel. In 1976 he moved to New York City. He is best known for producing, directing, and writing the screenplay for the 1982 cult film Liquid Sky. He also directed the 2004 documentary Stalin’s Wife (about Nadezhda Alliluyeva) and the 2008 film Perestroika. Prior to making Liquid Sky, Slava had a successful career as a documentary and TV film maker in the USSR and Israel. The screenplay was written by Slava Tsukerman, his wife and ubiquitous co-producer Nina V. Kerova, and Anne Carlisle, who also enacted the film’s two leading roles. The director of photography, Yuri Neyman, a Russian émigré, was the DP and special effects expert. Anne Carlisle also wrote a novel based on the movie in 1987.

 

Nina Tsyrkun

Nina Tsyrkun has PhD in Philosophy. She is a film critic and translator. Nina is the director of the Sector of Contemporary Screen Arts at the Institute for Cinema Studies (Moscow) and a member of the editorial boards of Kinovedcheskie zapiski and Iskusstvo kino. She is the author of several books, including Shattering the Rational, Elizabeth Taylor, Armen Dzhigarkhanian in Film and Life, The Wounded Beast: Pier Paolo Pasolini and His Films, Ranevskaia, From Paris with Love: Luc Besson and His Films. Her articles regularly appear in the journals Seans, Iskusstvo kino, Kinovedcheskie zapiski, and others.

 

Jeremy Woodruff

Jeremy Woodruff (B.M. Boston University, M.F.A. Brandeis University, M.Mus. Royal Academy of Music, London) studied composition with Michael Finnissy from 1999 – 2001 and Ethnomusicology at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam 2002 - 2004, with field research in Chennai, Bangalore and Mysore, India. In 2004 he moved to Berlin where he has been a guest lecturer at the University of the Arts, UdK and Conservatory, HfM “Hanns Eisler.” He is director and teacher at the Neue Musikschule Berlin. Currently he is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh. He is co-editor and co-moderator of the monthly radio broadcast ‘Lautstrom’ with Anna Bromley on reboot.fm. 88.4, free cultural radio Berlin, interviewing artists, composers and musicologists about their interdisciplinary sound work. His own creative work with artists has recently been featured at the Künstlerhaus Bremen, Kunst Hier und Jetzt in Wolfsburg, Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Robert Wilson’s Watermill Center, Clocktower Gallery in New York and in the Venice Biennale 2011. Jeremy is also an active composer and performer of experimental/electronic music. His writings have been published by Klangzeitort (Berlin) and by Verlag für Moderne Kunst (Nürnberg).